©2019 by The Dovetail Trio

Bold Champions

The Light Dragoon

Oh, the light dragoon rode over the hill,
When the moon was shining brightly,
There was a young lady and she knew him by his horse,
Because she loved him dearly.

Dearly, so dearly,

There was a young lady and she knew him by his horse,
Because she loved him dearly.

 

She’s taken him by the milk-white steed,
And led him to the stable.
“There's hay and corn for your horse, young man;
Let him eat while he is able.”

Able, so able,

“There's hay and corn for your horse, young man;
Let him eat while he is able.”

 

She’s taken him by the lily-white hand,
And led him to the table,
“There's cakes and wine for you, my dear,
Come and drink now you are able.”

Able, so able,

“There's cakes and wine for you, my dear,
Come and drink now you are able.”

 

She’s taken the bottle into her hand,
Poured out the wine so clearly.
“Here's a health to yours young man” she says,
“You're welcome home, my deary”

Deary, my deary,

“Here's a health to yours young man” she says,
“You're welcome home, my deary”

 

Oh, she ran upstairs to make the bed,
Oh, to make it warm and comfy.
How nimble she jumped into the bed
For to see if it was easy.

Easy, so easy,

How nimble she jumped into the bed
For to see if it was easy.

 

Oh the light dragoon he ran upstairs,
Put his trousers on the table;
How nimble he jumped into the bed
For to do what he was able.

Able, so able,

How nimble he jumped into the bed
For to do what he was able.

 

They laid in bed till the clock struck one,
The church bells they were chiming;
With her spirits so high and her belly so low,
And she ran home to her mummy.

Mummy, her mummy,

With her spirits so high and her belly so low,
And she ran home to her mummy.

 

“Oh, where have you been all this long night?”
Enquired her anxious parents.
“Oh, I've been along with the light dragoon
Because I love him dearly.”

Dearly, so dearly,

“Oh, I've been along with the light dragoon
Because I love him dearly.”

Black Eyed Susan

All in the Downs the fleet lay moored,

The streamers waving in the wind, 


When black-eyed Susan came on board;

"Oh, where shall I my true love find? 


Tell me you jovial sailors, tell me true 


If my sweet William, 


If my sweet William sails among your crew."



 

William, who high upon the yard, 


Rocked with the billows to and fro, 


'Twas then her well-known voice he heard, 


Then he sighed and cast his eyes below. 


The cord slides swiftly through his glowing hands,


And swift as lightning,


And swift as lightning on the deck he stands.



 

How swift the lark, high poised in air, 


Shuts close his pinions to his breast. 


By chance his mate's shrill call he hears, 


Then he drops at once into her nest. 


The noblest captain in the British fleet 


Might envy William's,


Might envy William’s lips those kisses sweet.



 

"Oh Susan, Susan, lovely dear, 


My vows forever true remain. 


Let me kiss off this falling tear, 


We only part to meet again. 


Love turns aside the cannon balls that fly, 


Lest precious tears,


Lest precious tears should fall from Susan's eye."



 

"Heed not the landsmen when they try 


To tempt away thy constant mind. 


They tell thee, sailors, when away, 


In every port a mistress find. 


Yes, yes, believe them when they tell thee so, 


For thou art present


For thou art present whereso'er I go."



 

"If to fair India's coast we sail, 


Thy eyes are like the diamonds bright. 


Thy breath is Afric's spicy gale, 


Thy skin is ivory so white. 


Thus every beauteous objects that I view, 


Wakes in my soul


Wakes in my soul some charm of lovely Sue."



The Bold Keeper

It's of a bold keeper in the chase of his deer,
He courted a nobleman's daughter so fair

“If you are as willing to that church you will ride
And there we'll get married, brave lady of mine.”

 

“My father is a lawyer, a lord of high renown,
If I should wed a keeper, it would pull my honour down,
Then your part and my part we never shall agree,
So you take this as a warning, bold keeper,” said she.

 

“No warning, no warning, no warning will I take,

I will fight or die my love all for thy sake.”

And when the lady heard these words it caused her heart to bleed

To the church they both went and were married with speed.

 

As they were a-riding through meadows so wide
With their broad swords and buckles hung down by their side
There they met her father with twenty bright men
And their broad glittering swords drawn ready in hand.

 

The bold keeper said “Now then, don't you stand to tattle.

There are twenty armed men just fitting for the battle,

For I will draw my broadsword and make their bones to rattle.”

And the lady held the horse for the bold keeper.

 

“Now then bold keeper, come pray hold your hand.
You shall have my daughter, ten thousand in hand.”
“Fight on,” says the lady, “That’s too small a sum.”
“Oh, hold your hand, keeper, and you shall have it all.”

 

So come all you young ladies that have gold in store

Never shun a bold keeper although he is poor

Although he is poor, he will fight for you sake

So here’s a health to your love, the bold keeper.

A Broadside

A story, a story, I'm just a-going to tell,
It's of a young maiden, in London she did dwell.
And before I conclude, well, you all shall quickly hear
How she ventured her life for the one she loved so dear.

So come all you young fellows, be gallant and true,

And let us our enemies quickly pursue.
And when we overtake them, all on the ocean wide,
We will nearly draw up with them, we'll give them a broadside.

A broadside, a broadside, and at it we went;
For killing one another it was our full intent.
The very first broadside, our captain he was slain,
And the young damsel rose up in his place to remain.

For long hours we fought in a battle so rare.

'Til we scarce had a man who our ship could steer.
We scarce had a man that could fire off a gun
And the blood from our quarter-deck like water it did run.

 

So come all you young fellows, be gallant and true,

And let us our enemies quickly pursue.
And when we overtake them, all on the ocean wide,
We will nearly draw up with them, we'll give them a broadside.

For quarter, for quarter, the Frenchman he did cry.
"You'll get the finest quarter." The maiden did reply.
"You'll get the finest quarter that ever I can afford.
It's to kill, or be killed, me lads, or else jump overboard."

And now we've gained the victory, we'll take a glass of wine.
You drink luck to your truelove and I'll drink luck to mine.
And here's to the maiden that gal of greatest fame,

And our good ship The Royal Lad in battle made its name.

 

So come all you young fellows, be gallant and true,

And let us our enemies quickly pursue.
And when we overtake them, all on the ocean wide,
We will nearly draw up with them, we'll give them a broadside.

 

Come all you young fellows, be gallant and true,

And let us our enemies quickly pursue.
And when we overtake them, all on the ocean wide,
We will nearly draw up with them, we'll give them a broadside.

Death & The Lady

As I walked out alone one day,

All in the merry month of May.

The birds did sing, and the lambs did play,

I met an old man all on the way.

I met an old man all on the way.

 

His head was bald his beard was grey,

His cheeks were of the mortal clay.

I asked him why he came that way,

From what strange place did he lately stray.

From what strange place did he lately stray.

 

“My name is Death, oh can’t you see.

Lords, dukes and ladies bow down to me.

And you are one of those branches three,

And you fair maid must come with me.

And you fair maid must come with me.”

 

“I’ll give you gold and jewels so rare,

I’ll give you costly robes to wear.

I’ll give you all of my earthly share,

If a few more years, my life you’ll spare.

If a few more years, my life you’ll spare.”

 

“Fair lady lay your bequests aside,

No longer glory in your pride.

No more in life will your body stay,

Your time is come, and you must away.

Your time is come, and you must away.”

 

And not long after this fair maid died,

“Write on my tomb”, the lady cried.

“Here lies a poor distressed maid,

Whom Death now lately hath betrayed.

Whom Death now lately hath betrayed.”

Bold Champions

Come, all you young men that delight in any game,
Come and listen to these few lines to you I will explain;
It's of two champions bold fought for a sum of gold,
And it was near London Town as I have been told.

Chorus (after each verse):
'Twas young Taylor, hurrah! 'Twas young Taylor, hurrah!
Bold Robinson for ever, and young Taylor, hurrah!

Now the drums and the trumpets most sweetly did sound,
And the horsemen they were mounted for to guard the ground;
The fight it was most noble, and young Taylor he did say,
“It never shall be said that to thee I give the day.”

Then up spoke bold Robinson, “The game it is my own,
And I can find his heart does tremble at my every blow;
Come, all you understanding men, I'll have you for to know,
That I will be the champion, wherever I do go.”

Then up spoke young Taylor, “I am just in my bloom,
I am willing for to fight thee from morning until noon.”
Young Taylor he then sprang, and gave bold Robinson a blow,
Saying, “I will be the champion wherever I do go.”

At the end of six rounds these champions did meet,
With their bodies sorely wounded, and their hearts so full of grief;
Bold Robinson he fell, without a sign or moan,
And from that moment when he died the battle it was won.

And now to conclude, when this young Taylor had won,
A rich lady fell in love with him for what he had done;
And if ever he recovers a grand wedding there shall be,
But young Taylor then he died at the end of days three.

Flower of London

It was of a rich merchant in London did dwell

He had only one daughter such a beautiful girl.

Forty thousand bright guineas was her fortune we’re told

Until she fell in love with a young sailor bold.

 

As soon as her father these tidings did hear

Upon this young man he had ventured to snare

He said “No more shall your true love go and plough the salt sea

For before tomorrow morning his butcher I’ll be.”

 

So a suit of fine sailor’s clothes she found out complete

And she dressed her own self from her head to her feet

With a ring on her finger and a cane in her hand

She met her honest William as she marched down the strand.

 

“Oh William, oh William, oh William my dear

My father, cruel father, sought your life in despair

So straight away to Dover I will have you appear

And in less than forty-eight hours I will meet you there.”


As she was a walking home down on the strand

She met her own father, saying, “You are this man”

And a sword from his side he then instantly drew

And her beautiful body he pierced it right through.

 

As soon as her father saw that it was she

His lips they did tremble and his eyes scarce could see.

Saying, “Wretched cruel monster, oh what have I done?

I have murdered my only daughter, the flower of London.”

 

As soon as young William these tidings did hear

He died broken hearted in grief and despair.

There was father and daughter and a young sailor bold

All died an untimely death for the sake of bright gold.

The Wreck of the Northfleet

Come listen all you feeling people
With dreadful news I do relate
An emigrant ship, which was the Northfleet

At last has met a wrecked fate

An emigrant ship, bound for Australia
Laid anchored off at Dungeness?

Bound for Australia was this vessel
To bid farewell, with fond caress

 

Chorus (after each verse):
God help the orphans and the widows

And comfort them, where they may be

May God above us all preserve us

From the dangers of the sea

 

A foreign steamer so it happened

Fast-sailing with the Channel tide

Came down upon this anchored vessel

And crashed within her timber sides

Away it went, this cruel steamer
Did not stop to see what wreck it made

'Mid human cries of shame and pity

Nor stopped to lend them helping aid

 

Who can describe the fight and terror
Aboard a sinking ship at sea?
The women screamed and strong men trembled

It was a sight of misery

"Launch out the boats", the Captain shouted

"The women first. Stand back the men"

They heeded not, but manly rush-ed

Threatening the boats to overwhelm

 

The Captain he could see the danger

Although he tried to avoid the rush

"I'll shoot the first that disobeys me"

Some reckless ones at last did rush

The Captain fired, his shot was fatal

And one poor wretch laid lifeless there

The men stood back upon the vessel

And looked around in sad despair

 

Now when this vessel fast was sinking

An' each one longed to save his life

This gallant Captain stood embracing

His new and lately married wife                      

"Oh let me die, with you my husband"
"Oh no, dear wife, that cannot be"
"Take care of her," he told his boatsmen

"While your poor Captain's drowned at sea"

 

An emigrant ship bound for Australia                                  

Led upwards of five hundred men
Scarce ninety souls were saved from drowning

God help their children and their wives

Now many an eye there will be weeping

An aching heart both far and near
A silent prayer for those departed
And shed for them a feeling tear

Claudy Banks

Twas on one summer's evening all in the month of May
Down by a flowery garden where Betsy did stray.
I overheard a damsel in sorrow to complain,
All for her absent lover that ploughs the raging main.

 

I stepped up to this fair maid and put her in surprise,
She owned she did not know me, I being all in disguise.
I said, “my charming creature, my joy and heart's delight,
How far have you to travel this dark and rainy night?”

 

“Away, kind sir, to the Claudy banks if you will please to show,
Pity a poor girl distracted for there I have to go.
I am in search of a young man and Johnny is his name,
And on the banks of Claudy I'm told he does remain.”

 

“If Johnny he was here this night he would keep me from all harm
But he's in the field of battle all in his uniform,
He is in the field of battle his foes he will destroy,
Like a roaring King of honour all in the wars of Troy.”

 

“It was six months or better since my Johnny left the shore,
He's a-cruising the wide ocean where the foaming billows roar,
He's a-cruising the wide ocean for honour or for gain,
But I'm told his ship got wrecked all on the coast of Spain.”

 

When Betsy heard this dreadful news she fell into despair,
In a-wringing of her hands and a-tearing of her hair.
“Since Johnny has gone and left me no man on earth I'll take,
Down in some lonesome valley I'll wander for his sake.”

 

Young Johnny hearing her say so he could no longer stand,
He fell into her arms crying, “Betsy, I'm that man,
I am that faithful young man and whom you thought was slain,
And since we met on Claudy banks we'll never part again.”

Two Sisters

There lived a lord in the North County

Bow down

There lived a lord in the North County

Bow down to me

There lived a lord in the North County

And he had daughters, one, two, three

I’ll be true to my love if my love be true to me

 

A young man came a-courting there

Bow down

A young man came a-courting there

Bow down to me

A young man came a-courting there

And he made choice of the youngest there

I’ll be true to my love if my love be true to me

 

He gave the youngest a gay gold ring

Bow down

He gave the youngest a gay gold ring

Bow down to me

He gave the youngest a gay gold ring

He never bought the oldest a single thing

I’ll be true to my love if my love be true to me

 

“Oh sister dear, let us walk out”

Bow down

“Oh sister dear, let us walk out”

Bow down to me

“Oh sister dear, let us walk out

To see the ships sailing about”

I’ll be true to my love if my love be true to me

 

As they walked out to the salty brim

Bow down

As they walked out to the salty brim

Bow down to me

As they walked out to the salty brim

The oldest pushed the youngest in

I’ll be true to my love if my love be true to me

 

“Oh sister dear, lend me your hand”

Bow down

“Oh sister dear, lend me your hand”

Bow down to me

“Oh sister dear, lend me your hand

And I will give you my house and land”

I’ll be true to my love if my love be true to me

 

“I’ll neither lend you my hand nor glove”

Bow down

“I’ll neither lend you my hand nor glove”

Bow down to me

“I’ll neither lend you my hand nor glove

But I will have your own true love”

I’ll be true to my love if my love be true to me

 

Oh down she sank and away she swam

Bow down

Oh down she sank and away she swam

Bow down to me

Oh down she sank and away she swam

Into the miller’s fish-pond she ran

I’ll be true to my love if my love be true to me

 

The miller came out with his fish-hook

Bow down

The miller came out with his fish-hook

Bow down to me

The miller came out with his fish-hook

And he fished the fair maid out the brook

I’ll be true to my love if my love be true to me

 

He robbed her of her gay gold ring

Bow down

He robbed her of her gay gold ring

Bow down to me

He robbed her of her gay gold ring

Back to the brook he pushed her in

I’ll be true to my love if my love be true to me

 

The miller was hung at his mill-gate

Bow down

The miller was hung at his mill-gate

Bow down to me

The miller was hung at his mill-gate

The oldest sister was burned at the stake

I’ll be true to my love if my love be true to me

The Old Churchyard

Come, come with me out to the old churchyard,
I so well know those paths beneath the soft green sward.
Friends slumber there who we want to regard;
We will trace out their names in the old churchyard.

Mourn not for them, for their trials are all o'er,
And why weep for those who will weep no more?
For sweet is their sleep, though cold and hard
Their pillows may be in the old churchyard.

 

I know that it's vain when our friends depart
To breathe kind words to a broken heart;
And I know that the joy of life is marred
When we follow lost friends to the old churchyard.

But were I at rest beneath yonder tree,
Why would you weep, my friends, for me?
I'm so weary, so wayworn, why would you retard
The peace that I seek in the old churchyard?

 

Why weep for me, for I'm anxious to go
To that haven of rest where no tears ever flow;
And I fear not to enter that dark lonely tomb
Where our saviour has lain and conquered the gloom.

I rest in the hope that one bright day
Sunshine will burst through these prisons of clay,
And Gabriel's trumpet and voice of the Lord
Will wake up the dead in the old churchyard

 

I rest in the hope that one bright day
Sunshine will burst through these prisons of clay,
And Gabriel's trumpet and voice of the Lord
Will wake up the dead in the old churchyard

The Old Churchyard

Four and twenty fiddlers all of a row x 2

- Fiddle fiddle faddle semi demi quavers down below

 

Chorus (after every verse):

It is my lady’s holiday so let the lass be merry x 2

 

Four and twenty tinkers all of a row x 2

- Ooo rub-a-dub hey rub-a-dub

- Fiddle fiddle faddle semi demi quavers down below

 

Four and twenty huntsmen all of a row x 2

- Tantorero, Tantorero

- Ooo rub-a-dub hey rub-a-dub

- Fiddle fiddle faddle semi demi quavers down below

 

Four and twenty cobblers all of a row x 2

- Cobbler cobbler stab awl

- Tantorero, Tantorero

- Ooo rub-a-dub hey rub-a-dub

- Fiddle fiddle faddle semi demi quavers down below

 

Four and twenty tailors all of a row x 2

- One caught a louse t’other let him loose, t’other cried cut him down with a goose

- Cobbler cobbler stab awl

- Tantorero, Tantorero

- Ooo rub-a-dub hey rub-a-dub

- Fiddle fiddle faddle semi demi quavers down below

 

Four and twenty fencing masters all of a row x 2

- Push dirt cut across

- One caught a louse t’other let him loose, t’other cried cut him down with a goose

- Cobbler cobbler stab awl

- Tantorero, Tantorero

- Ooo rub-a-dub hey rub-a-dub

- Fiddle fiddle faddle semi demi quavers down below

 

Four and twenty priests all of a row x 2

-Two ruffles to every shirt

- Push dirt cut across

- One caught a louse t’other let him loose, t’other cried cut him down with a goose

- Cobbler cobbler stab awl

- Tantorero, Tantorero

- Ooo rub-a-dub hey rub-a-dub

- Fiddle fiddle faddle semi demi quavers down below

 

Four and twenty barbers all of a row x 2

- Devilish hard times, two shaves, one penny

-Two ruffles to every shirt

- Push dirt cut across

- One caught a louse t’other let him loose, t’other cried cut him down with a goose

- Cobbler cobbler stab awl

- Tantorero, Tanteraro

- Ooo rub-a-dub hey rub-a-dub

- Fiddle fiddle faddle semi demi quavers down below

 

Four and twenty Apostles all of a row x 2

- Abraham begat Isaac, Isaac begat Jacob, Jacob begat the twelve tribes of Isreal

- Devilish hard times, two shaves, one penny

-Two ruffles to every shirt

- Push dirt cut across

- One caught a louse t’other let him loose, t’other cried cut him down with a goose

- Cobbler cobbler stab awl

- Tantorero, Tantorero

- Ooo rub-a-dub hey rub-a-dub

- Fiddle fiddle faddle semi demi quavers down below